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Joost Bats

Monetary Policy

Division

Capital Markets/Financial Structure

Current Position

Economist

Fields of interest

Financial Economics,Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics

Email

Joost.Bats@ecb.europa.eu

Other current responsibilities
2021-

Research Fellow, University of Amsterdam

Education
2021

PhD in Economics, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands

2016

MSc in Economics: Monetary Policy and Banking, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Professional experience
2021-

Economist, Capital Markets/Financial Structure, Directorate General Monetary Policy, European Central Bank

2016-2021

Economist, Monetary Operations, Directorate General Financial Markets, Dutch Central Bank

Teaching experience
2016

Teaching assistant, Finance and Investment Portfolio Theory

2013-2015

Teaching assistant, International Economics and Financial Accounting

12 August 2022
WORKING PAPER SERIES - No. 2708
Details
Abstract
This paper investigates the relationship between central bank (reverse) auctions and bill market liquidity. The analysis includes data on the purchases of bills in the auctions by the Dutch Central Bank under the European Central Bank’s Pandemic Emergency Purchase Programme (PEPP). The results indicate that auctions contribute to smooth market functioning. Two findings stand out. First, by purchasing bills using auctions rather than bilaterally, the central bank increases the bid-to-cover ratio at bill issuance, especially in times of stress. Second, bills are offered at larger sizes and lower prices in central bank auctions near primary issuance.
JEL Code
E42 : Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics→Money and Interest Rates→Monetary Systems, Standards, Regimes, Government and the Monetary System, Payment Systems
E44 : Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics→Money and Interest Rates→Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
E52 : Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics→Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit→Monetary Policy
E58 : Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics→Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit→Central Banks and Their Policies
G12 : Financial Economics→General Financial Markets→Asset Pricing, Trading Volume, Bond Interest Rates
19 May 2022
WORKING PAPER SERIES - No. 2664
Details
Abstract
This paper documents a durable increase in the cross-sectoral dispersion of earnings expectations during the COVID-19 crisis. The rise in dispersion of earnings forecasts can be explained by the introduction of lockdown measures, which had a particularly adverse impact on the travel sector. Accordingly, in terms of earnings expectations, countries that are relatively independent of the travel sector were least affected by a tightening of lockdowns. At the same time, vaccinations have been a game changer: more stringent lockdown measures added far less to the cross-sectoral dispersion in earnings expectations once vaccines started to be rolled out in late 2020. Going forward, the dispersion in earnings expectations continues to stand at elevated levels.
JEL Code
E44 : Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics→Money and Interest Rates→Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
G10 : Financial Economics→General Financial Markets→General
G12 : Financial Economics→General Financial Markets→Asset Pricing, Trading Volume, Bond Interest Rates
5 August 2021
ECONOMIC BULLETIN - BOX
Economic Bulletin Issue 5, 2021
Details
Abstract
More than a year after the onset of the COVID-19 crisis, euro area stock prices have risen close to all-time highs, mainly driven by a recovery in earnings expectations. However, COVID-19 and the associated lockdowns have left a larger and longer-lasting mark on some companies than on others. Indeed, earnings expectations have become more heterogeneous across sectors, in line with expectations of an uneven recovery. This stands in sharp contrast with the developments during the Global Financial Crisis, when cross-sectoral dispersion first dropped and then normalised.Empirical analysis suggests that cross-sectoral dispersion in 12-month earnings per share forecasts has increased with each tightening of lockdown measures. At the same time, the start of vaccination campaigns has been a game changer: since the vaccine rollout began in late 2020, more stringent lockdown measures have added far less to the dispersion in earnings expectations.
JEL Code
E44 : Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics→Money and Interest Rates→Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
G10 : Financial Economics→General Financial Markets→General
G12 : Financial Economics→General Financial Markets→Asset Pricing, Trading Volume, Bond Interest Rates
2020
Journal of Banking and Finance
  • Bats, J.V., Houben, A.C.F.J.
2021
The Netherlands Central Bank Working Paper
  • Bats, J.V., Greif, W., Kapp, D.
2020
Bruegel Blog
  • Bats, J.V., Houben, A.C.F.J., Schoenmaker, D.
2020
VoXEU
  • Bats, J.V., Giuliodori, M., Houben, A.C.F.J.
2020
SUERF Policy Note
  • Bats, J.V., Giuliodori, M., Houben, A.C.F.J.
2020
The Netherlands Central Bank Working Paper
  • Bats, J.V.
2020
The Netherlands Central Bank Working Paper
  • Bats, J.V., Giuliodori, M., Houben, A.C.F.J.
2019
The Netherlands Central Bank Working Paper
  • Bats, J.V., Hudepohl, T.S.M.
2018
The Netherlands Central Bank Occasional Studies
  • Bats, J.V., van den End, J.W., Thoolen, J.