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Antonio Colangelo

19 June 2023
STATISTICS PAPER SERIES - No. 44
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Abstract
This paper contributes to the ongoing efforts by the European authorities to reduce the reporting burden for banks by assessing the statistical methods currently used to compile data on financial transactions related to securities holdings. Based on statistical information collected from the Banca d’Italia, we compare data on purchases of securities net of sales and redemptions reported by banks with transaction estimates based on indirect (balance sheet) methods that are permitted within the methodological framework of datasets compiled by the European System of Central Banks (ESCB). Although the direct method of collecting data on transactions is more costly for reporting agents, it produces results which are fully aligned with current statistical methodological standards (European System of Accounts 2010, ESA 2010). By contrast, the indirect method is a simplified and less costly approach. The recent development of high-quality data sources such as the ESCB integrated system for the market prices of securities – the Centralised Securities Database – has boosted the attractiveness of indirect methods since they have the potential to deliver accurate and reliable estimates. The significance of the differences between direct collection and indirect compilation of these data is analysed in detail for listed ISIN securities that are actively traded on exchanges, by also considering the impact of price volatility and trading activity. From an aggregated perspective, all indirect methods produce results which are comparable and consistent with the ESA 2010 methodology for all instrument types. There are some minor differences for equity instruments, due to the higher price volatility and trading activity associated with these instruments, but the overall aggregated dynamics are also well captured by indirect methods in these cases. [...]
JEL Code
C18 : Mathematical and Quantitative Methods→Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General→Methodological Issues: General
C81 : Mathematical and Quantitative Methods→Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology, Computer Programs→Methodology for Collecting, Estimating, and Organizing Microeconomic Data, Data Access
G15 : Financial Economics→General Financial Markets→International Financial Markets
27 July 2016
STATISTICS PAPER SERIES - No. 16
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Abstract
Cash pooling is a bank service that allows corporates to externalise the intra-group cash management, and thus manage their global liquidity effectively with lower costs. Although there is little quantitative information on the significance of the phenomenon, cash pooling appears to have become increasingly popular after the onset of the financial crisis when, in an environment characterised by limited access to capital markets, reduced bank lending, low returns and higher risks on banks' deposits, corporate groups started to maximise their use of internal sources of financing. In particular, cash pooling is currently very relevant in Western and Northern European countries, and is mainly offered in the United Kingdom, France and the Netherlands. This paper first analyses cash pooling agreements with a focus on the aspects that are relevant from a statistical viewpoint. It then addresses their statistical recording in compliance with ESA 2010 and, specifically, the methodological framework of Monetary Financial Institutions (MFI) balance sheet item statistics. It is proposed that positions related to cash pooling shall be recorded on a gross basis vis-
JEL Code
G21 : Financial Economics→Financial Institutions and Services→Banks, Depository Institutions, Micro Finance Institutions, Mortgages
G32 : Financial Economics→Corporate Finance and Governance→Financing Policy, Financial Risk and Risk Management, Capital and Ownership Structure, Value of Firms, Goodwill
E51 : Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics→Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit→Money Supply, Credit, Money Multipliers
E43 : Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics→Money and Interest Rates→Interest Rates: Determination, Term Structure, and Effects
M41 : Business Administration and Business Economics, Marketing, Accounting→Accounting and Auditing→Accounting
4 June 2010
WORKING PAPER SERIES - No. 1204
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Abstract
Banks do not charge explicit fees for many of the services they provide but the service payment is bundled with the offered interest rates. This output therefore has to be imputed using estimates of the opportunity cost of funds. We argue that rather than using the single short-term, low-risk interest rate as in current official statistics, reference rates should more closely match the risk characteristics of loans and deposits. For the euro area, imputed bank output is, on average, 24 to 40 percent lower than according to current methodology. This implies an average downward adjustment of euro area GDP (at current prices) between 0.16 and 0.27 percent.
JEL Code
E01 : Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics→General→Measurement and Data on National Income and Product Accounts and Wealth, Environmental Accounts
E44 : Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics→Money and Interest Rates→Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
O47 : Economic Development, Technological Change, and Growth→Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity→Measurement of Economic Growth, Aggregate Productivity, Cross-Country Output Convergence