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Julia Catz

14 April 2010
OCCASIONAL PAPER SERIES - No. 109
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Abstract
In mid-September 2008, a global financial crisis erupted which was followed by the most serious worldwide economic recession for decades. As in many other regions of the world, governments in the euro area stepped in with a wide range of emergency measures to stabilise the financial sector and to cushion the negative consequences for their economies. This paper examines how and to what extent these crisis-related interventions, as well as the fall-out from the recession, have had an impact on fiscal positions and endangered the longer-term sustainability of public finances in the euro area and its member countries. The paper also discusses the appropriate design of fiscal exit and consolidation strategies in the context of the Stability and Growth Pact to ensure a rapid return to sound and sustainable budget positions. Finally, it reviews some early lessons from the crisis for the future conduct of fiscal policies in the euro area.
JEL Code
E5 : Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics→Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit
E2 : Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics→Consumption, Saving, Production, Investment, Labor Markets, and Informal Economy
Network
Eurosystem Monetary Transmission Network
20 February 2020
STATISTICS PAPER SERIES - No. 33
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Abstract
Since the financial crisis, central bank policymakers have expressed a need for more integrated microdata for monetary policy purposes and for macroprudential and microprudential supervision, with a stronger focus on lending. In response to this policy need, the European System of Central Banks (ESCB) has increased the scope and quality of instrument-level data (e.g. loan-by-loan) it collects. At the same time, the ESCB has further developed the Register of Institutions and Affiliates Data (RIAD), which is pivotal in ensuring the successful linking of the databases, because it ensures the unique identification of counterparties. RIAD allows data to be aggregated using various types of company information, such as industrial activity or geographical location, but it also offers the possibility of aggregating data according to multiple group structures based on different concepts of what a “group” is. This paper discusses why there is a policy need for microdata and highlights some of the practical uses of the interlinked data. It also sheds more light on how information contained in different granular databases can be combined and aggregated in a flexible manner according to different business needs. It describes in detail the process of linking through a common stable identifier, points out current limitations and suggests a possible way forward.
JEL Code
C81 : Mathematical and Quantitative Methods→Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology, Computer Programs→Methodology for Collecting, Estimating, and Organizing Microeconomic Data, Data Access
E44 : Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics→Money and Interest Rates→Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
G32 : Financial Economics→Corporate Finance and Governance→Financing Policy, Financial Risk and Risk Management, Capital and Ownership Structure, Value of Firms, Goodwill