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Miguel Casares

1 March 2001
WORKING PAPER SERIES - No. 49
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Abstract
Structural models are a powerful tool for business cycle and monetary policy analysis because they are invariant to either policy changes or external shocks. In this paper, we derive a Sidrauski-type model in which both the demand and supply side are structural in the sense that the behavioral equations obtained are rigorously calculated from optimizing decisions of the individuals. Moreover, we introduce price stickiness on the supply side decisions so as to have relevant short-run real effects of monetary policy through the real interest rate channel. The resulting medium-size model will be calibrated and estimated for the euro area, some simulations on business cycle and monetary policy analysis will be carried out.
JEL Code
E20 : Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics→Consumption, Saving, Production, Investment, Labor Markets, and Informal Economy→General
E32 : Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics→Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles→Business Fluctuations, Cycles
E52 : Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics→Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit→Monetary Policy
1 May 2002
WORKING PAPER SERIES - No. 147
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Abstract
One of the most significant characteristics of optimizing models is that the behavioral equations involved are typically forward looking, i.e. agents are concerned about the futures rather than the past. This creates difficulties when modelling some of the business-cycle patterns widely observed in modern economies. For example, it is not easy to obtain the delay in the response of the rate of inflation to a monetary shock. This paper shows that an optimizing monetary model with endogenous capital, sticky prices, sticky wages, and adjustment costs of investment, can replicate a lag in the maximum response of both output and inflation to an interest rate shock when taking into account a time-to-build requirement for investment projects.
JEL Code
E12 : Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics→General Aggregative Models→Keynes, Keynesian, Post-Keynesian
E22 : Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics→Consumption, Saving, Production, Investment, Labor Markets, and Informal Economy→Capital, Investment, Capacity
E47 : Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics→Money and Interest Rates→Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications
1 May 2002
WORKING PAPER SERIES - No. 140
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Abstract
This paper examines how price setting plays a key role in explaining the steady-state effects of inflation in a monopolistic competition economy. Three pricing variants (optimal prices, indexed prices, and unchanged prices) are introduced through a generalization of the Calvo-type setting that allows the possibility of price indexation, i.e., prices may be adjusted by the rate of inflation. We found that in an economy with less indexed prices the steady-state negative impact of inflation on output is higher. In the extreme case without no price indexation at all (purely Calvo-type economy), unrealistically heavy falls in capital and output were reported when steady-state inflation increases. Regarding welfare analysis, our results support a long-run monetary policy aimed at price stability with a close-to-zero inflation target. This finding is robust to any price setting scenario.
JEL Code
E13 : Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics→General Aggregative Models→Neoclassical
E31 : Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics→Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles→Price Level, Inflation, Deflation
E50 : Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics→Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit→General