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Simonetta Rosati

28 February 2005
WORKING PAPER SERIES - No. 443
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Abstract
We analyse the distribution of the TARGET cross-border interbank payment flows, from both a cross-section and time series point of view, using average daily data for the period 1999-2002. We find out that first, "location matters", in the sense that bilateral payment flows seem to reflect an organisation of interbank trading between countries whereby the size of the banking sectors, geographical proximity and cultural similarities play a significant role. This result is confirmed also by a model developed drawing on the gravity models literature. Second, we find that the payment traffic in TARGET is strongly affected by market technical deadlines. In addition, such traffic is positively related mainly to the liquidity conditions and to the turnover of the euro area money market, (particularly the unsecured overnight segment). Our model also provides a good explanation of the determinants of the interbank payments settled in the EURO 1 system.
JEL Code
E58 : Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics→Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit→Central Banks and Their Policies
G20 : Financial Economics→Financial Institutions and Services→General
G21 : Financial Economics→Financial Institutions and Services→Banks, Depository Institutions, Micro Finance Institutions, Mortgages
24 August 2007
OCCASIONAL PAPER SERIES - No. 68
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Abstract
Custody is, in essence, a service consisting in holding (and normally administering) securities on behalf of third parties. In step with the growth of sophisticated financial markets, custody has evolved into a complex industry no longer characterised by physical safekeeping but by a range of information and banking services. Given the multi-tier structure of the industry, custody services are provided by a variety of intermediaries. This paper describes the development of the custody industry and the structure of the custody services market. It also discusses the risks involved in custody and the challenges the industry is facing, particularly in the European context.
JEL Code
G15 : Financial Economics→General Financial Markets→International Financial Markets
G21 : Financial Economics→Financial Institutions and Services→Banks, Depository Institutions, Micro Finance Institutions, Mortgages
L22 : Industrial Organization→Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior→Firm Organization and Market Structure
18 December 2007
OCCASIONAL PAPER SERIES - No. 76
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Abstract
This paper analyses the current national and international regulatory regimes relevant for European banks, CSDs and ICSDs, and compares them with the requirements in order to answer the following questions: Is there any overlap between the provisions of the CPSS-IOSCO Recommendations and the existing international and national requirements to which European SSSs and banks are subject? Are current provisions equivalent or more restrictive ("super-equivalent") for banks and CSDs? In what respect? Does the overlap between the CPSS-IOSCO Recommendations and existing regulation result in double requirements? This paper presents the results of this comparative analysis and attempts to answer such questions.
JEL Code
G21 : Financial Economics→Financial Institutions and Services→Banks, Depository Institutions, Micro Finance Institutions, Mortgages
G28 : Financial Economics→Financial Institutions and Services→Government Policy and Regulation
30 April 2012
OCCASIONAL PAPER SERIES - No. 133
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Abstract
Shadow banking, as one of the main sources of financial stability concerns, is the subject of much international debate. In broad terms, shadow banking refers to activities related to credit intermediation and liquidity and maturity transformation that take place outside the regulated banking system. This paper presents a first investigation of the size and the structure of shadow banking within the euro area, using the statistical data sources available to the ECB/Eurosystem. Although overall shadow banking activity in the euro area is smaller than in the United States, it is significant, at least in some euro area countries. This is also broadly true for some of the components of shadow banking, particularly securitisation activity, money market funds and the repo markets. This paper also addresses the interconnection between the regulated and the non-bank-regulated segments of the financial sector. Over the recent past, this interconnection has increased, likely resulting in a higher risk of contagion across sectors and countries. Euro area banks now rely more on funding from the financial sector than in the past, in particular from other financial intermediaries (OFIs), which cover shadow banking entities, including securitisation vehicles. This source of funding is mainly shortterm and therefore more susceptible to runs and to the drying-up of liquidity. This finding confirms that macro-prudential authorities and supervisors should carefully monitor the growing interlinkages between the regulated banking sector and the shadow banking system. However, an in-depth assessment of the activities of shadow banking and of the interconnection with the regulated banking system would require further improvements in the availability of data and other sources of information.
JEL Code
G01 : Financial Economics→General→Financial Crises
G15 : Financial Economics→General Financial Markets→International Financial Markets
G21 : Financial Economics→Financial Institutions and Services→Banks, Depository Institutions, Micro Finance Institutions, Mortgages
G28 : Financial Economics→Financial Institutions and Services→Government Policy and Regulation
17 December 2019
WORKING PAPER SERIES - No. 2342
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Abstract
The global nature of derivatives markets, and the presence of large key financial institutions trading in several markets across the globe, call for taking a “macro” view on the interconnections arising in the clearing network. Based on the analysis of derivatives transactions data reported under the EMIR Regulation we reconstruct the network of relationships in the centrally-cleared derivatives market and analyse its topology providing insight into its structural features. The centrally-cleared derivatives network is modelled in the form of a multiplex network where each layer is represented by a derivatives asset class market. In turn, each node represents a single counterparty in that market. On the basis of different centrality measures applied to the collapsed aggregate and to the multiplex network, the critical participants of the euro area centrally-cleared derivatives market are identified and their level of interconnectedness analysed. This paper provides insight on how the collected data pursuant to the EMIR regulation can be used to shed light on the complex network of interrelations underlying the financial markets. It provides indications on structural features of the euro area centrally-cleared derivatives market and discusses policy relevant implications and future applications.
JEL Code
G01 : Financial Economics→General→Financial Crises
G15 : Financial Economics→General Financial Markets→International Financial Markets
G23 : Financial Economics→Financial Institutions and Services→Non-bank Financial Institutions, Financial Instruments, Institutional Investors